OECD report: time for a rethink on Edtech?

By John Helmer

Computer in wheelie binThis month the OECD published data that showed having more computers in school does not necessarily lead to better educational outcomes. This was reported by some parts of the media in terms that might have made you believe processors emit some kind of noxious, brain-impairing gas.

  • ‘Computer look like an obstacle to learning (Chicago Tribune)
  • ‘Computers “do not improve” pupil results’ (BBC)
  • ‘Schools wasting money on computers for kids’ (CNBC)
  • ‘Don’t bother buying computers for schools’ (The Register)
  • ‘Lack of computers in school may be a blessing’ (Irish Times)

The general tenor of these headlines seems to be that if you really want to drive up educational results in a school, the best thing you can do is park a skip outside and chuck in every piece of technology you can lay your hands on.

Only, the actual report doesn’t say anything of the sort.

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The importance of unlearning: report from the Think Tank

By John Helmer

finger point to sign saying Think TankL&D faces a seemingly impossible task: equipping millennials to lead in a future organisational context of which they may have even less visibility than their millennial learners. New learning strategies must be adopted to meet this challenge – and a certain amount of instructional ‘baggage’ jettisoned. These were insights that came out of the third of a three-part Think Tank discussion we held recently in London.

Millennials are now the largest single generational cohort in the workforce and assuming leadership positions. To discuss how we can best support their leadership learning, and respond to the points raised in our recently released insight paper, Leadership, learning and the connected generation, we assembled an invited group of L&D leaders and now report their discussion under Chatham House rules.

Delegates were from organisations including Belron, The Home Office, IEDP, Lloyds Banking Group, MOD, Pragma Consulting, Rolls Royce and Vodafone. Most of our delegates have day-to-day contact with workforces that include large numbers of millennials, and some were from organisations whose workforce is drawn almost entirely from this age group.

Here’s what they had to say.

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Learn how to leverage the skills of your new Millennials

By Harriet Croxton

New employees in a waiting roomSeptember is a month when many of us will be sending children back to school, or waving them off to college and university – while for organisations it is a time to welcome a new intake of first jobbers and graduate trainees, among whom will doubtless be the dynamic leaders of the future.

We’ve been studying Millennials and their behavior a lot over the past months and talking to industry experts on their thoughts on how to lead them. What’s emerged from our conversations has been quite a surprise. We were expecting to hear that they are cosseted, entitled narcissists who shirk responsibility but we have learned is that this is not really the case. They are not really that different from generations before.

So what is different?

The main difference comes with their use of technology and the way they communicate. The modern millennials communicate in a lateral, collaborative way, using social media and similar tools to share ideas. They are used to reaching out to a network and asking opinions; their whole decision making process is more collaborative.

New research shows that organisations are failing to capitalise on the unique capabilities possessed by this rising generation, now the largest generational cohort in the workforce. They are missing out and not making the most of technology and its ability to facilitate collaborative communication.

We decided to explore this topic further in a webinar titled, Leverage the unique skills of your millennial leaders, which you can listen to at the link below.

You will hear leadership expert Jennifer Deal, senior research scientist at the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL©) in San Diego, California, share unique insights on Millennials from her upcoming book. Prepare for some myth busting!

Then Carole Bower, Head of Learning Solutions at Lumesse, gives you ten tips for leveraging your Millennial leaders’ unique skills.

Leverage the unique skills of your millennial leaders


How not to lose your millennial leaders: report from the Think Tank

By John Helmer

Man holding sign saying 'Think Tank'The digital habits of Millennials create friction where organisations push for smart, speedy results from them – but provide slow, clunky knowledge tools with which to do it. Organisations that fail to use learning and communications technologies effectively risk losing their millennial leaders-in-waiting as a result. These were insights that came out of the second of a three-part Think Tank discussion we held recently in London.

Millennials are now the largest single generational cohort in the workforce and assuming leadership positions. To discuss how we can best support their leadership learning, and respond to the points raised in our recently released insight paper, Leadership, learning and the connected generation, we assembled an invited group of L&D leaders and now report their discussion under Chatham House rules.

Delegates were from organisations including Belron, The Home Office, IEDP, Lloyds Banking Group, MOD, Pragma Consulting, Rolls Royce and Vodafone. Most of our delegates have day-to-day contact with workforces that include large numbers of millennials, and some were from organisations whose workforce is drawn almost entirely from this age group.

Here’s what they had to say.

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