Category Archives: Insight-based learning

11 ways to empower the self-directed learner

By John Helmer

Graphic ident for research report Me Time: Empowering the Self-Directed Learner Recently our Head of Transformation, Rachel Cook, contributed a piece to this blog about how changes in the pattern of employment are shaking up the employer/employee relationship. One of the most interesting aspects of Rachel’s work for us was how these changes ­– momentous enough to get analysts talking in terms of a ‘fourth industrial revolution’ – are highlighting the phenomenon of the self-directed learner.

Aware that this is a source of much debate for the learning and development clients we work with, and in many cases a pain point, we wanted to know more.

We reached out to our research partners, Towards Maturity, for help in investigating this phenomenon, and commissioned a report written by Peter Williams, editor of e.learning age entitled Me Time: Empowering the Self-Directed Learner that you can download for free. The findings were fascinating. Continue reading


L&D skills gaps the chief barrier to progress in learning analytics

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Learning Analytics theme with graphs, etc. in a thought bubbleCapability gaps, and a historical culture of not evaluating training, are seen as major barriers to success in learning analytics for L&D. Learning analytics offers L&D a wealth of new opportunities it was found, but our Think Tank delegates identified nine key challenge areas.

Lumesse Think Tank events are held with an invited group of L&D leaders, who discuss issues in learning under Chatham House rules. Contributing to this debate were delegates from the worlds of finance, logistics, FMCG, mining, pharmaceuticals, professional services and commodities trading.

Download a highlights report of the whole discussion.

And for a deep dive into the section on challenges, read on as we address the following question:

Where are the biggest challenges/barriers for L&D in learning analytics?

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Learning analytics: 8 opportunities for L&D

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Learning Analytics theme with graphs, etc. in a thought bubbleLearning analytics offers L&D a wealth of new opportunities to increase the effectiveness of training and to be better aligned with organisational goals in today’s data-driven business environment. Our Think Tank delegates identified eight key opportunity areas.

Lumesse Think Tank events are held with an invited group of L&D leaders, who discuss issues in learning under Chatham House rules. Contributing to this debate were delegates from the worlds of finance, logistics, FMCG, mining, pharmaceuticals, professional services and commodities trading.

Download a highlights report of the whole discussion.

And for a deep dive into the section on opportunities, read on as we address the following question:

Where are the biggest opportunities for L&D in learning analytics?

Continue reading


Is L&D ready for learning analytics?

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Learning Analytics theme with graphs, etc. in a thought bubbleLearning professionals are reaching out beyond their traditional data sources and methodologies to embrace a new world of learning analytics. However, innovation is sporadic and held back in many organisations by a historical culture of not evaluating effectively (if at all).

This was just one of a number of fascinating insights that arose from our latest Think Tank dinner.

We assembled an invited group of L&D leaders to discuss these issues in a three-part discussion held under Chatham House rules. Contributing to the debate were delegates from the worlds of finance, logistics, FMCG, mining, pharmaceuticals, professional services and commodities trading.

Download a highlights report of the discussion.

But for those who want a deep dive into the first part of this fascinating discussion, read on, as we address the following question:

Part 1: What examples can we see of organisations using learning analytics and insights in new ways?

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Learning analytics in the age of big data

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Learning Analytics theme with graphs, etc. in a thought bubble What we can’t measure, we can’t manage, according to the business cliché. And suddenly, it seems we are able to measure a lot more than we could before: there has been an explosion in new data sources. So is this making businesses more manageable? It’s certainly having effects – in all parts of the enterprise, including learning. Learning analytics is becoming increasingly important for L&D. But do they know how to use the new learning analytics effectively?

Our latest Think Tank takes this as a subject, with a specific focus on how we can deploy actionable insights and analytics from data to fine-tune learning programmes.

As an introduction to the blog posts and reports that will come out of the Think Tank in the weeks and months to come, let’s take a look at this new data hoard, and the kinds of structured and unstructured data that are available to learning departments.

Highlights Report from the Think Tank is now available here 

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Lumesse Learning switches on new social channel

By Harriet Croxton

Having had Vimeo as the home to our video content for many years we are turning on an additional channel to give our audience wider access to our video content.

We recognise we’ve a long way to go before we reach the dizzy heights of YouTubers like PewDiePie and the Smosh boys and we apologise for the lack of cute kittens – however  for those of you interested in the latest news, thoughts, tricks and hacks from one of the leading learning and development vendors, it has everything you could wish for.

Our new channel can be found here and on it you’ll find:-

  • Insight videos: The latest thought leadership insights from industry leaders and the Lumesse Learning team
  • Lumesse Showreels: Showcasing Lumesse’s learning products and services
  • Webinars: Recordings of our webinars on products and thought leadership discussions

To give you a taster of what’s on offer take a look at our video on our Bespoke Learning Development. With over 10 years’ experience in creating award-winning learning content this offers a snapshot of some of the projects we’ve worked on for corporate and  public sector organisations worldwide.

And to make up for the lack of kitten videos, irrelevant cute kitten picture coming up.

Cute Kitten

Subscribe today!  Or the kitten gets it!


What motivates self-directed learners?

By Richenda Sabine

Graphic of carrot on a stick to illustrate motivating self-directed learnersWhat motivates you? Is it money, purpose, or something else? According to Maslow (Hierarchy of Needs) our basic needs of security, identity and stimulation have to be met before we progress to self-actualisation (growing and developing to reach our individual potential).

Consider this in the context of learning. Without motivation, learning is rarely effective, so how do you motivate learners in the first place?

The answer, it turns out, is that they can largely do it for themselves.

Daniel Pink, in his book ‘Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us‘, dismisses the carrot-and-stick approach and tells us to forget everything we think about motivating people. He believes that the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today’s world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and the world.

This view is borne out In the organisational context of today by the phenomenon of the self-directed learner, which has been well documented in research from learning benchmarking experts Towards Maturity, telling us that:

  • 88% learn more by finding things out for themselves, rather than through F2F training
  • 87% know what they need to learn in order to do their job
  • 74% know how to access what they need for learning

The research also shows a worrying disconnect with what some learning managers think about their learners, indicating that it is more than ever important to understand what motivates the self-directed learner.

There are two types of motivation:

  • Intrinsic – internally generated and comes from personal enjoyment or from a sense of obligation
  • Extrinsic – generated externally from objects, other people and the environment

The burning question in the world of workplace learning is how to keep these two types of motivation aligned, and not in contradiction with each other, so that self-directed learners stay engaged and motivated.

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5 reasons why learning needs to get the omnichannel

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Retail in LearningOops, here comes a buzzword. And surely we need another one of those like we need a hole in the head. But there’s a serious idea behind this one – the omnichannel – an idea that was born in the world of retail, but which has important implications for learning and communications across all business sectors.

Omnichannel has become a thing in retail because major shopping brands have seen changes in customer behaviour – around the huge proliferation of smartphone use and the convergence of physical and virtual spaces – that are seriously disrupting their markets.

According to Google, 82% of smartphone users turn to their phones inside a store when making purchase decisions. And that process of decision making is highly likely to blend visits to a store with visits to a website. A process of research that starts on smartphone might end up with purchase in a shop around the corner – or vice versa. And it might also involve use of a tablet and a desktop PC along the way.

Infographic giving statistics for consumer use of the omnichannel in purchase decisions

This is where shoppers live now, in the omnichannel, moving seamlessly between physical spaces in the real world and spaces accessed virtually, through a screen. It’s where we all live.

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How insight-driven learning drives better business results 

By John Helmer

Light bulb and dollar coin characters holding hands.An organisation wanted to improve the presentation skills of its executives. Trouble was, the executives in question didn’t see that there was anything to improve.

Middle-aged, empowered males for the most part, they reacted incredibly negatively to any suggestion that they might need training in this area – or in any other area, for that matter. Offers of training fell on deaf ears, or worse, were interpreted as a primal challenge to their personal authority. Meanwhile, poor communication and miscommunication from these executives were holding the organisation back.

So how do you train people who have such a strong psychological investment in their own unimprovability?

The answer, in this case, was a learning campaign that avoided anything the executives might recognise as ‘learning’. Rather than producing another course, the team created a glossy magazine-style publication to get the content across, positioning it as exclusive, inside information just for this cadre – but definitely non-mandatory and to be accessed at will.

Reception has been enthusiastic and the company now has the tools to tackle this important skills gap effectively.

Insight-driven learning

The example we have just given shows insight-driven learning in action.

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