Category Archives: Motivation in learning

Lumesse launches new product for the age of the self-directed learner

By John Helmer

Me:time logo and running man imageWe’re really proud to announce the launch of a ground-breaking new product for the self-directed learner, designed to help organisations succeed in today’s fast-changing business environment.

me:time was created and conceived by the Lumesse Learning team following an extensive process of consultation and research into the needs of learners and learning professionals. Employees are increasingly taking control of their own learning, and at the same time organisations are discovering that nurturing and supporting a culture of self-directed learning increases their ability to survive and thrive.

Offering a consumer-style experience, me:time puts the needs of self-motivated learners first, giving instant, anywhere access to curated learning supported by AI-driven recommendations. A system of credits allocated by the organisation gives learners full control over their personal me:time budget.

Andrea Miles, General Manager for Lumesse Learning, said: ‘me:time represents a radical rethink in learning control and choice, freeing the learner to self-serve. We’re passionate about this new approach because we think it can contribute massively to the wellbeing of employees. Organisations, too will benefit as they know they need to encourage continuous learning in the face of increasing demands to be nimble and smart, and meeting the challenges of talent retention and mobility. We’re incredibly excited about what we’ve created and look forward to introducing it to all our valued clients and to progressive players across all sectors.’

me:time key features:

  • Focused on individual needs and goals
  • Instant, anywhere learning
  • Credits-based subscription system
  • AI-driven personal learning recommendations
  • Wide-ranging curated content from world-leading providers
  • Consumer-style experience and brand

Find out more on the me:time website:
www.metimelearning.com


11 ways to empower the self-directed learner

By John Helmer

Graphic ident for research report Me Time: Empowering the Self-Directed Learner Recently our Head of Transformation, Rachel Cook, contributed a piece to this blog about how changes in the pattern of employment are shaking up the employer/employee relationship. One of the most interesting aspects of Rachel’s work for us was how these changes ­– momentous enough to get analysts talking in terms of a ‘fourth industrial revolution’ – are highlighting the phenomenon of the self-directed learner.

Aware that this is a source of much debate for the learning and development clients we work with, and in many cases a pain point, we wanted to know more.

We reached out to our research partners, Towards Maturity, for help in investigating this phenomenon, and commissioned a report written by Peter Williams, editor of e.learning age entitled Me Time: Empowering the Self-Directed Learner that you can download for free. The findings were fascinating. Continue reading


The uberisation of work

By Rachel Cook

uberisationChanges in the pattern of employment will have a significant impact on learning, recent research indicates. In many cases these effects are being felt already. L&D professionals need to make preparations now, so as not to be caught on the back foot.

Seismic changes are shaking the world of work. A shift is seen in the relationship between organisations and the people who work for them, typified by the disruption wrought in the transportation industry by Uber. Uber, a ride sharing app enabled by GPS and mobile technology, is now starting to dominate the US business travel market. According to the Economist and Certify, in the first quarter of 2016, Uber and Lyft accounted for 46% of business ‘ground transportation’ trips in America. Traditional competitors (notably, taxi firms) have been displaced with surprising speed. It is not just the technology that is causing this market disruption, but the business model used by the company. Uber has a permanent employee base which represents its core beliefs and practices but also a huge flexible component. Continue reading


Vlog: the STARFISH model for gamification of learning

By John Helmer

starfish_vlogPeople talk a lot about gamification of learning but what does it really entail? Gaming structures and techniques can massively improve engagement with learning, and bring dry subjects like compliance vividly to life. But simply adding a leaderboard and a few badges your learners can win to a standard elearning course will not cut the mustard.

So how do you make sure your learning programme is really tapping into the authentic power of game-based learning?

In this, the first of a new series of learning vlogs introduced by our own Carl Crisostomo, Carole Bower takes to Brighton Beach to illustrate a handy mnemonic that can help you ensure your gamified learning programme is the real deal.

Contact us if you’d like to discuss how we can help you provide engaging and innovative gamified programmes for your learners.


What motivates self-directed learners?

By Richenda Sabine

Graphic of carrot on a stick to illustrate motivating self-directed learnersWhat motivates you? Is it money, purpose, or something else? According to Maslow (Hierarchy of Needs) our basic needs of security, identity and stimulation have to be met before we progress to self-actualisation (growing and developing to reach our individual potential).

Consider this in the context of learning. Without motivation, learning is rarely effective, so how do you motivate learners in the first place?

The answer, it turns out, is that they can largely do it for themselves.

Daniel Pink, in his book ‘Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us‘, dismisses the carrot-and-stick approach and tells us to forget everything we think about motivating people. He believes that the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today’s world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and the world.

This view is borne out In the organisational context of today by the phenomenon of the self-directed learner, which has been well documented in research from learning benchmarking experts Towards Maturity, telling us that:

  • 88% learn more by finding things out for themselves, rather than through F2F training
  • 87% know what they need to learn in order to do their job
  • 74% know how to access what they need for learning

The research also shows a worrying disconnect with what some learning managers think about their learners, indicating that it is more than ever important to understand what motivates the self-directed learner.

There are two types of motivation:

  • Intrinsic – internally generated and comes from personal enjoyment or from a sense of obligation
  • Extrinsic – generated externally from objects, other people and the environment

The burning question in the world of workplace learning is how to keep these two types of motivation aligned, and not in contradiction with each other, so that self-directed learners stay engaged and motivated.

Continue reading