Ways you can use xAPI right now to enhance learning

By Sven Ove Sjølyst

In this pre-recorded video Sven Ove Sjolyst, Product Manager for CourseBuilder gives a walk-through of new improvements and features of CourseBuilder, with the spotlight particularly on xAPI implementation.

xAPI adds a whole new dimension when creating learning content, more than was achievable with SCORM; allowing a much richer experience and more micro level view of how users are interacting with content.

This Vlog explains the exciting changes that are now possible.

 


The uberisation of work

By Rachel Cook

uberisationChanges in the pattern of employment will have a significant impact on learning, recent research indicates. In many cases these effects are being felt already. L&D professionals need to make preparations now, so as not to be caught on the back foot.

Seismic changes are shaking the world of work. A shift is seen in the relationship between organisations and the people who work for them, typified by the disruption wrought in the transportation industry by Uber. Uber, a ride sharing app enabled by GPS and mobile technology, is now starting to dominate the US business travel market. According to the Economist and Certify, in the first quarter of 2016, Uber and Lyft accounted for 46% of business ‘ground transportation’ trips in America. Traditional competitors (notably, taxi firms) have been displaced with surprising speed. It is not just the technology that is causing this market disruption, but the business model used by the company. Uber has a permanent employee base which represents its core beliefs and practices but also a huge flexible component. Continue reading


Vlog: the STARFISH model for gamification of learning

By John Helmer

starfish_vlogPeople talk a lot about gamification of learning but what does it really entail? Gaming structures and techniques can massively improve engagement with learning, and bring dry subjects like compliance vividly to life. But simply adding a leaderboard and a few badges your learners can win to a standard elearning course will not cut the mustard.

So how do you make sure your learning programme is really tapping into the authentic power of game-based learning?

In this, the first of a new series of learning vlogs introduced by our own Carl Crisostomo, Carole Bower takes to Brighton Beach to illustrate a handy mnemonic that can help you ensure your gamified learning programme is the real deal.

Contact us if you’d like to discuss how we can help you provide engaging and innovative gamified programmes for your learners.


The challenge of mobile learning content

By John Helmer

Illustration of happy learners using mobile learningResearch from Towards Maturity shows that two out of three learners find accessing mobile learning essential or very useful, and 57% like to be able to access learning on the go.

Meanwhile in the US, where 50% of the US workforce holds a job that is compatible with at least partial telework and approximately 20-25% of the workforce teleworks at some frequency (according to GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com) learning solutions that support mobile learning are increasingly being seen as essential.

67% of organisations in the Towards Maturity sample now offer mobile learning in some form, but many struggle with getting the right content in place for this channel.

The options can seem bewildering. Should you build or buy for a start?

Then, if you’ve decided to buy off the shelf e-learning content, where can you find mobile content that really works on mobile devices?

On the other hand, if you’ve decided to build your own, what are the important design principles you should follow – and which is the best content authoring tool to use?

Because we know these are troublesome issues for many of our regular readers, we recently put together a webinar that brought together the key experts within Lumesse Learning on mobile content. Between them they span the key fields of knowledge about

  • OTS content for mobile
  • Learning design for mobile
  • Technology for mobile authoring

To watch a recording of this lively roundtable session  – click the link below.

Webinar: Mobile learning content. How to get it, how to build it ­– and how to make it fabulous


How adaptive pathways make digital learning more elastic

By Nicholas Murphy

Close-up elastic band to illustrate making digital learning more elasticOne of the key challenges for digital learning design is creating solutions that meet the needs of all learners. Risk often drives decision-making when it comes to content: if we don’t know how much people already know, we create content that tries to teach everybody everything, regardless of their level of expertise. This is particularly true for any training that is driven by a regulatory or compliance motivation.

Challenging this approach has become a key driver for us at Lumesse in moving, with our clients, towards a more personalised, learner-centric dynamic.

Typically, courses teach and then test: it’s the foundation of most e-learning. But that model is founded on an assumption that the audience will have a low baseline of understanding. The reality, however, is that most learner populations will already know quite a bit about a given topic (even if some of that ‘knowledge’ comes from hearsay, myth or legend!).

One sure way of making the learner switch off is to make them sit through a lot of material they know already. So reversing the teach-test structure and running an initial diagnostic has been a principle in learning for some time. Test me first, teach me what I don’t know, and then test me again.

However, both of these approaches are limited. They work for content you need to remember, but much less well for behavioural competency, where we need to feed the subconscious to drive behavioural changes.

Increasingly, we are beginning to use adaptive learning paths to increase the effectiveness of digital learning. Here’s how it works.

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Flash conversion to HTML5 gains urgency for learning content

By John Helmer

graphic illustrating Flash conversion to HTML5 - superhero business man arrests declining arrow The long slow death of Flash could be entering a terminal phase – with big implications for any organisation that has large amounts of learning content developed in Flash.

Concerns have grown about serious security vulnerabilities in Flash (a patch released in March addressed 23 separate security bugs). Meanwhile, major video platforms such as YouTube, Daily Motion and BBC have either migrated to HTML5 already or are in the process of doing so. Now Google has announced that it will phase out full support for Flash in its Chrome browser by the end of 2016, seen by many as sounding the death knell. Other browsers, too, are following suit.

This raises the worry that Flash might be supported by Adobe going forward with less than 100% enthusiasm and energy – making security worries all the more intense when it comes to legacy content.

Of course, publicly, Adobe is committed to not leaving its past users high and dry: ‘the responsible thing for Adobe to do is to continue to support Flash with updates and fixes, as we help the industry transition,’ it told Fortune. However, the company’s statements leave no doubt as to where the future lies: ‘Looking ahead, we encourage content creators to build with new web standards.’ Meaning, principally, HTML5. Renaming its web animation software from Adobe Flash Professional to Adobe Animate CC was seen as yet another step in the company’s distancing itself from the Flash brand.

So where does this leave organisations with hours and hours of learning content developed in Flash – content that might be in daily use around the organisation, but which could increasingly become the source of business-critical security risks?

Continue reading


Adaptive learning is not a blue-sky technology

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate adaptive learning course authoringGiven some of the hype-driven media coverage, you might be forgiven for thinking that adaptive learning is one of those blue-sky, might-come-soon technologies you need a masters in machine learning to understand.

But you’d be wrong. Adaptive learning is a right-here, right-now technology. True, at the very high end, there are some heavyweight AI-driven systems (with correspondingly heavyweight price-tags) in the space. But the ability to create content that adapts to the learner’s needs is becoming increasingly mainstream. In fact, you can do it yourself.

That’s right: you don’t even need to get your development partner to build it for you. With an authoring tool like CourseBuilder 8, in-house development teams can create learner-adaptive content of considerable sophistication right now.

The benefits of adaptive learning are easy to understand. Sven Ove Sjølyst , our very own CourseBuilder guru, lists them in this slideshare, and shows how you can use CourseBuilder’s powerful ‘branching’ capability to personalise learning to the individual learner.

Based on a pre-test, several different types of adaptivity can be built into a course:

  1. Role-specific – learners get only the learning appropriate to their role or level
  2. Scaffolding based on level – learners are presented with a selection of learning from different levels, based on their role
  3. Scaffolding based on results – a bad fail on a quiz within the learning that might indicate significant knowledge gaps, will cause different screens to be presented of lower level knowledge
  4. Free play – the learner decide the order, accessing content in their own time and in the order they prefer to do it
  5. JIT – content can be presented ‘just-in-time’ according to need at that specific moment, and fully searchable

This last type of adaptability is especially appropriate for learning accessed on a mobile device. CourseBuilder 8 supports mobile learning, but also learning across all devices, including desktop and tablet as well, for a true omnichannel experience.

To find out more about how you can create adaptive learning with CourseBuilder – or to book a free demo – drop us a line on learning@lumesse.com.

 


5 reasons why learning needs to get the omnichannel

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Retail in LearningOops, here comes a buzzword. And surely we need another one of those like we need a hole in the head. But there’s a serious idea behind this one – the omnichannel – an idea that was born in the world of retail, but which has important implications for learning and communications across all business sectors.

Omnichannel has become a thing in retail because major shopping brands have seen changes in customer behaviour – around the huge proliferation of smartphone use and the convergence of physical and virtual spaces – that are seriously disrupting their markets.

According to Google, 82% of smartphone users turn to their phones inside a store when making purchase decisions. And that process of decision making is highly likely to blend visits to a store with visits to a website. A process of research that starts on smartphone might end up with purchase in a shop around the corner – or vice versa. And it might also involve use of a tablet and a desktop PC along the way.

Infographic giving statistics for consumer use of the omnichannel in purchase decisions

This is where shoppers live now, in the omnichannel, moving seamlessly between physical spaces in the real world and spaces accessed virtually, through a screen. It’s where we all live.

Continue reading



How insight-driven learning drives better business results 

By John Helmer

Light bulb and dollar coin characters holding hands.An organisation wanted to improve the presentation skills of its executives. Trouble was, the executives in question didn’t see that there was anything to improve.

Middle-aged, empowered males for the most part, they reacted incredibly negatively to any suggestion that they might need training in this area – or in any other area, for that matter. Offers of training fell on deaf ears, or worse, were interpreted as a primal challenge to their personal authority. Meanwhile, poor communication and miscommunication from these executives were holding the organisation back.

So how do you train people who have such a strong psychological investment in their own unimprovability?

The answer, in this case, was a learning campaign that avoided anything the executives might recognise as ‘learning’. Rather than producing another course, the team created a glossy magazine-style publication to get the content across, positioning it as exclusive, inside information just for this cadre – but definitely non-mandatory and to be accessed at will.

Reception has been enthusiastic and the company now has the tools to tackle this important skills gap effectively.

Insight-driven learning

The example we have just given shows insight-driven learning in action.

Continue reading