5 ways that learning content is changing

By Amelia Fuell

Colourful image of a head made up of boxes which are moving and evolving into something elseIn our recent whitepaper, ‘The Future of Learning Content‘ we investigated the ways in which learning content was evolving, as well as the implications for L&D departments, and the practical steps they might take to create a winning content strategy. Here are some insights taken from the whitepaper around how content is changing.

Technological innovation is changing the ways that we produce, deliver and consume learning content. The traditional self-paced e-learning course is in decline, and we are moving towards a mobile-centric, multi-format digital-learning paradigm where learner engagement is key. Here are the main 5 ways we found that content is changing: Continue reading


Why Brexit uncertainty means trouble for L&D

By John Helmer

Man with umbrella in waist-deep water in the rain to illustrate Brexit uncertaintyHR’s recent drive to develop ‘VUCA’ leadership turns out to have been timely: the situation created by Brexit is volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. And of the four letters making up that acronym it is the ‘U’ – uncertainty – that is currently causing most concern for the People function.

On a webinar given by Lumesse partners IEDP I learned that HR people are ‘hungry for certainty’ over Brexit. With the March 2019 deadline set by the UK government’s triggering of Article 50 beginning to loom unpleasantly, we find ourselves 25% of the way through the process but with no clarity at all about which of the various possible leaving scenarios will prevail.

IEDP’s Roddy Millar asked guest presenter Michael Skapinker (Executive Editor Financial Times / IE Business School Corporate Learning Alliance) whether he was seeing any specific solutions or approaches that HR departments were putting in place to prepare themselves for leaving: ‘How can one prepare oneself for something that one doesn’t know?’ replied Skapinker; ‘we don’t know what the situation will be.’

At time of writing, everything still seems to be in play; meaning anything from a Norway-style scenario where the UK retains some access to the single market, through a transitional period of as-yet-undetermined length which might smooth out the lumps and bumps, to a so-called ‘train-crash’ Brexit where Britain leaves without a trade deal and operates under WTO rules.

Whether you’re a beleaver or a remoaner – whether or not you think suffering the pain of divorce is worth the eventual rewards we might reap from leaving the EU – it is hard to deny that there will be pain.

So where are the problem areas for L&D?

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7 ways to make self-directed learning stick

By Amelia Fuell

Cartoon image of learner training her brain, caption: step by step I trained my brain not to wander offLearning has never been more accessible. For virtually any skill – whether it’s learning a language, coding, business management or yoga – learners motivated by their own personal needs and goals will be able to find an online platform or application that has been created to help them. Self-directed learning is becoming more popular too: for example, 58 million people have registered for a massive open online course (MOOC)s since 2011, with nearly half of those signing up in 2016 alone.

But while technology has widened opportunities for skills development, information overload is a growing challenge. There are some 80,000 different education apps on the App Store alone. Furthermore, attrition rates are high: over 90% of people who start a MOOC will never finish it. In the age of distraction, many of us are guilty of downloading an app on our phones with good intentions, but then failing to use it long term.

If you are keen to start learning new skills online, then it can be hard to pick the right course and even harder to stick at it. So how can you create successful habits that will help you learn effectively and achieve your goals? Here are a few essential tips …
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Lumesse launches new product for the age of the self-directed learner

By John Helmer

Me:time logo and running man imageWe’re really proud to announce the launch of a ground-breaking new product for the self-directed learner, designed to help organisations succeed in today’s fast-changing business environment.

me:time was created and conceived by the Lumesse Learning team following an extensive process of consultation and research into the needs of learners and learning professionals. Employees are increasingly taking control of their own learning, and at the same time organisations are discovering that nurturing and supporting a culture of self-directed learning increases their ability to survive and thrive.

Offering a consumer-style experience, me:time puts the needs of self-motivated learners first, giving instant, anywhere access to curated learning supported by AI-driven recommendations. A system of credits allocated by the organisation gives learners full control over their personal me:time budget.

Andrea Miles, General Manager for Lumesse Learning, said: ‘me:time represents a radical rethink in learning control and choice, freeing the learner to self-serve. We’re passionate about this new approach because we think it can contribute massively to the wellbeing of employees. Organisations, too will benefit as they know they need to encourage continuous learning in the face of increasing demands to be nimble and smart, and meeting the challenges of talent retention and mobility. We’re incredibly excited about what we’ve created and look forward to introducing it to all our valued clients and to progressive players across all sectors.’

me:time key features:

  • Focused on individual needs and goals
  • Instant, anywhere learning
  • Credits-based subscription system
  • AI-driven personal learning recommendations
  • Wide-ranging curated content from world-leading providers
  • Consumer-style experience and brand

Find out more on the me:time website:
www.metimelearning.com


Meet your new co-worker: a ‘cobot’

By Adriana Hamacher

Screeching, scary headlines along the lines of “Robots are taking our jobs!” mask a real trend that is emerging: collaborative robots, AKA cobots, which augment, rather than remove, human labour. Compact and highly-flexible, cobots are designed to work safely alongside humans, as opposed to behind a barrier or inside a cage. They are among the fastest growing segments in the robotics market and global sales are expected to reach $3.3 billion in just five years, according to one estimate. So we’ll be seeing a lot more of them very soon.

So what are the implications for the humans who have to learn how to work with these cobots? Continue reading


How L&D can help line managers to support learning

By Duncan Barrett

website_blog_300x170While many organisations are looking at how best to support a culture of learning and meet the needs of self-directed learners, many are still dealing with the challenge of engaging employees around content that needs to be delivered and understood by its workforce, whether for compliance or operational reasons.

For L&D teams facing this challenge, the most important ally must surely be the line manager.

We explore these themes in our webinar: Learning in the Line: L&D, line managers & the self-directed learner 

Line managers form a silent (or not so silent) army of support that is ready, willing and able to guide their teams in meeting the challenges of uncertainty and complexity that are sweeping through the world of work as we know it … Well – something along those lines!

In truth, line managers are pulled in multiple directions to meet the needs of the organisation as well as their team.

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11 ways to empower the self-directed learner

By John Helmer

Graphic ident for research report Me Time: Empowering the Self-Directed Learner Recently our Head of Transformation, Rachel Cook, contributed a piece to this blog about how changes in the pattern of employment are shaking up the employer/employee relationship. One of the most interesting aspects of Rachel’s work for us was how these changes ­– momentous enough to get analysts talking in terms of a ‘fourth industrial revolution’ – are highlighting the phenomenon of the self-directed learner.

Aware that this is a source of much debate for the learning and development clients we work with, and in many cases a pain point, we wanted to know more.

We reached out to our research partners, Towards Maturity, for help in investigating this phenomenon, and commissioned a report written by Peter Williams, editor of e.learning age entitled Me Time: Empowering the Self-Directed Learner that you can download for free. The findings were fascinating. Continue reading


The uberisation of work

By Rachel Cook

uberisationChanges in the pattern of employment will have a significant impact on learning, recent research indicates. In many cases these effects are being felt already. L&D professionals need to make preparations now, so as not to be caught on the back foot.

Seismic changes are shaking the world of work. A shift is seen in the relationship between organisations and the people who work for them, typified by the disruption wrought in the transportation industry by Uber. Uber, a ride sharing app enabled by GPS and mobile technology, is now starting to dominate the US business travel market. According to the Economist and Certify, in the first quarter of 2016, Uber and Lyft accounted for 46% of business ‘ground transportation’ trips in America. Traditional competitors (notably, taxi firms) have been displaced with surprising speed. It is not just the technology that is causing this market disruption, but the business model used by the company. Uber has a permanent employee base which represents its core beliefs and practices but also a huge flexible component. Continue reading


L&D skills gaps the chief barrier to progress in learning analytics

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Learning Analytics theme with graphs, etc. in a thought bubbleCapability gaps, and a historical culture of not evaluating training, are seen as major barriers to success in learning analytics for L&D. Learning analytics offers L&D a wealth of new opportunities it was found, but our Think Tank delegates identified nine key challenge areas.

Lumesse Think Tank events are held with an invited group of L&D leaders, who discuss issues in learning under Chatham House rules. Contributing to this debate were delegates from the worlds of finance, logistics, FMCG, mining, pharmaceuticals, professional services and commodities trading.

Download a highlights report of the whole discussion.

And for a deep dive into the section on challenges, read on as we address the following question:

Where are the biggest challenges/barriers for L&D in learning analytics?

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Learning analytics: 8 opportunities for L&D

By John Helmer

Graphic to illustrate Learning Analytics theme with graphs, etc. in a thought bubbleLearning analytics offers L&D a wealth of new opportunities to increase the effectiveness of training and to be better aligned with organisational goals in today’s data-driven business environment. Our Think Tank delegates identified eight key opportunity areas.

Lumesse Think Tank events are held with an invited group of L&D leaders, who discuss issues in learning under Chatham House rules. Contributing to this debate were delegates from the worlds of finance, logistics, FMCG, mining, pharmaceuticals, professional services and commodities trading.

Download a highlights report of the whole discussion.

And for a deep dive into the section on opportunities, read on as we address the following question:

Where are the biggest opportunities for L&D in learning analytics?

Continue reading