Why Brexit uncertainty means trouble for L&D

By John Helmer November 06, 2017

Man with umbrella in waist-deep water in the rain to illustrate Brexit uncertaintyHR’s recent drive to develop ‘VUCA’ leadership turns out to have been timely: the situation created by Brexit is volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. And of the four letters making up that acronym it is the ‘U’ – uncertainty – that is currently causing most concern for the People function.

On a webinar given by Lumesse partners IEDP I learned that HR people are ‘hungry for certainty’ over Brexit. With the March 2019 deadline set by the UK government’s triggering of Article 50 beginning to loom unpleasantly, we find ourselves 25% of the way through the process but with no clarity at all about which of the various possible leaving scenarios will prevail.

IEDP’s Roddy Millar asked guest presenter Michael Skapinker (Executive Editor Financial Times / IE Business School Corporate Learning Alliance) whether he was seeing any specific solutions or approaches that HR departments were putting in place to prepare themselves for leaving: ‘How can one prepare oneself for something that one doesn’t know?’ replied Skapinker; ‘we don’t know what the situation will be.’

At time of writing, everything still seems to be in play; meaning anything from a Norway-style scenario where the UK retains some access to the single market, through a transitional period of as-yet-undetermined length which might smooth out the lumps and bumps, to a so-called ‘train-crash’ Brexit where Britain leaves without a trade deal and operates under WTO rules.

Whether you’re a beleaver or a remoaner – whether or not you think suffering the pain of divorce is worth the eventual rewards we might reap from leaving the EU – it is hard to deny that there will be pain.

So where are the problem areas for L&D?

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7 ways to make self-directed learning stick

By Amelia Fuell September 26, 2017

Cartoon image of learner training her brain, caption: step by step I trained my brain not to wander offLearning has never been more accessible. For virtually any skill – whether it’s learning a language, coding, business management or yoga – learners motivated by their own personal needs and goals will be able to find an online platform or application that has been created to help them. Self-directed learning is becoming more popular too: for example, 58 million people have registered for a massive open online course (MOOC)s since 2011, with nearly half of those signing up in 2016 alone.

But while technology has widened opportunities for skills development, information overload is a growing challenge. There are some 80,000 different education apps on the App Store alone. Furthermore, attrition rates are high: over 90% of people who start a MOOC will never finish it. In the age of distraction, many of us are guilty of downloading an app on our phones with good intentions, but then failing to use it long term.

If you are keen to start learning new skills online, then it can be hard to pick the right course and even harder to stick at it. So how can you create successful habits that will help you learn effectively and achieve your goals? Here are a few essential tips …

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Lumesse launches new product for the age of the self-directed learner

By John Helmer September 06, 2017

Me:time logo and running man imageWe’re really proud to announce the launch of a ground-breaking new product for the self-directed learner, designed to help organisations succeed in today’s fast-changing business environment.

me:time was created and conceived by the Lumesse Learning team following an extensive process of consultation and research into the needs of learners and learning professionals. Employees are increasingly taking control of their own learning, and at the same time organisations are discovering that nurturing and supporting a culture of self-directed learning increases their ability to survive and thrive.

Offering a consumer-style experience, me:time puts the needs of self-motivated learners first, giving instant, anywhere access to curated learning supported by AI-driven recommendations. A system of credits allocated by the organisation gives learners full control over their personal me:time budget.

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Financial advice the Amazon way

By Mark McClelland August 24, 2017

Piggy bank on calculator Financial advice for consumers is not a happy place. Government and regulators are trying their best to improve the market and safeguard individuals’ finances. But the industry seems to doubt progress.

A major review – the Financial Advice Market Review (FAMR) – was launched by HM Treasury and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) two years ago. They wanted to ensure that the financial advice market was working properly for consumers – delivering affordable and accessible advice. The issue was urgent after big changes such as the government pension reforms which means people could access all the cash from pension pots previously locked away.

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8 pointers for learning enablement

By Carole Bower August 22, 2017

BAndaged head with glassesHow do you ‘enable’ learning? That’s a question that many Learning and Development people are asking right now as they strive to become “invisible” – a term Bersin uses to describe “a mind-set and approach that enables and assists learning wherever and whenever it occurs in an organization”.

Self-directed learning, invisible L&D and learning enablement are all big themes for Lumesse right now. In the latest edition of The Curve magazine, I wrote about how organisations are shifting from a top-down learning approach to the enablement of self-directed learning, and our recent Think Tank event revealed that the organisations we invited had a consensus view on the validity of an invisible L&D function (as long as the importance of L&D was acknowledged and the results were not invisible!).

So back to the big question – how can L&D switch their focus from creators and distributors of learning to the enablement of learning, where the impact is definitely felt?

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SAR: new guidance from the Information Commissioner

By Mark McClelland August 15, 2017

Clerk on high ladder extracts a file from a massive filing cabinetAn updated code of practice promises to make it tougher to comply with data protection law.

The new guidance from the Information Commissioner – the UK’s independent data protection regulator – makes it clear that there is a ‘high expectation’ that organisations should be providing information in response to a subject access request (SAR).

Changes have been put in place to reflect recent case law. The burden of proof will be on data controllers – those enterprises that hold personal information about individuals – to show that they took all reasonable steps to comply with the SAR.

The guidance from the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) does say that data controllers are only required to carry out ‘a reasonable and proportionate’ search for personal data.

These changes are significant and are set to impact virtually every organisation of any size in the UK.

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GDPR: Clock ticking for implementing new data protection rules

By Mark McClelland August 08, 2017

Cartoon policeman arrests cartoon villain with hands in data fileMany European companies face a race against time to comply with stricter rules on dealing with customer data that will come into force next Spring. Failure to comply with the new rules – set out in the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – would far outstrip the cost of investment in providing staff with the learning they need, yet many organisations have not yet put the necessary training in place.

From May 2018, firms who breach the new data laws face a maximum fine of 4% of the previous year’s annual global turnover or €20 million, whichever is the higher. The implementation of updated data rules is happening at a time when serious data breaches have caught out well-known companies across different sectors. But recent research by data management consultancy Consult Hyperion suggests that financial institutions are particularly at risk. The consultancy is estimating that the fines levied by the new regime could reach €5 billion in the first three years.

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Lumesse Learning grows digital skills for 230,000 employees

By Trudi Taylor August 01, 2017

leadership concept with 3d rendering red ladder with shining light bulbLumesse Learning is proud to announce a new client relationship with a global professional services firm, which has selected Lumesse Learning to create a learning programme for all staff across all its regions and service lines.

This programme aims to build a basic fluency in digital transformation and how client-facing teams can help their clients navigate the digital landscape.

Lumesse Learning’s response to the brief is an engaging, dynamic digital learning experience which:

• Uses videos and case studies to gain emotional buy-in and to humanise the subject matter

• Raises confidence levels through practical support resources

• Makes the complex simple through animation and interactive graphics

Andrea Miles, General Manager for Lumesse Learning, said: ‘Digital transformation is a subject close to our hearts as a digital company, and with a learning team based in Brighton, one of the UK’s most innovative and exciting digital hubs, we felt this was a dream brief for us. We are delighted to welcome a new addition to the roster of our many loyal customers, and look forward to working closely with them to fulfil the needs of their business.’

Mind the gap: digital skills in the age of artificial intelligence

By Adriana Hamacher July 06, 2017

Man with hollow head split in halfEsther Animashaun was working as a sales associate for stationery retailer Moleskine when opportunity came knocking. Having dropped out of college uninspired by what she was learning, Esther still refused to give up on a career in IT. But she was after something different and one day she found it via an apprenticeship provider. Esther is now working to plug a gaping hole in the UK’s IT skills pipeline, the result of burgeoning demand for artificial intelligence technology. AI investment is gaining momentum; 42 per cent of companies are planning to ramp up spending over the next five years and one in five has recently done so, according to a new survey by the Confederation of British Industry in association with IBM.

The benefits are irresistible. AI technologies promise to improve operational efficiency and reduce costs, they also upgrade legacy IT systems, improve data and analytics, enhance client services and, as a result, increase revenue generation.

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Robots need not apply: a future-proof guide to jobs in the automation era

By Adriana Hamacher June 14, 2017
Photo of desktop toy robot

Image by Matthew Hurst/Flickr

I’ll kid you not, it won’t be easy. Companies looking for fail-safe strategies for the coming years will need to create specialised work environments for jobs that don’t yet exist, in sectors that have not yet been created. A recent WEF study found that 60 per cent of the jobs that will be most in demand over the next decade have not even been invented yet. What’s more, according to some analysts, a large portion of core academic curriculum content is already out of date by the time students graduate. Skills instability is on the up in all industries, with many current roles hard to recruit for.

It’s not helpful that the experts disagree on whether automation will have a devastating effect on human employment or not. What differs from previous waves of upheaval, many say, is that the pace of change is greater and its effect is broader; the automation era demands that displaced workers in routine, unskilled jobs graduate to non-routine, skilled jobs to stay ahead, instead of moving to similar-level jobs in other industries as before. Early indications suggest the employment market isn’t evolving fast enough to keep up with this change.

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